Behold

A collection of pretty things.

crom-cristianortiz:

As promised I did my own version of a Nausicaa Poster. I was struggling with the colour palette and thats why it got so messy. 

(via joshtierney)


Up Close: Armour 1700-1799 (X)

Up Close: Armour 1700-1799 (X)

(Source: themagicmissile)

thegoblinmarketofficial:

Facts, Myth, and Lore about RavensThe raven - bird of mystery, magic and omens both good and bad. Raven symbolism is rich and plentiful, with a plethora of raven mythology, raven lore and raven superstitions available from a wealth of cultures.The raven often has a bad press, for being a carrion bird it is ultimately associated with death, and consequently considered a bad omen by many, or a forewarning of war.But there is much more to this enigmatic and intelligent bird than death, darkness and destruction. Raven is a trickster, a protector, a teacher. and a bringer of great magic.Raven Biology: Natural History of the RavenAbout the RavenCorvus Corax. Member of the crow familyThe raven is not only the largest member of the crow family, but the largest perching bird in the world. An extremely intelligent bird, the raven was once extremely common, but persecution now finds it only in remote areas such as cliffs, mountains and moors.The adult is completely black with a shaggy throat and heavy bill. It flies higher than the crow and is adept at aerial acrobatics.It is a carrion bird, feeding the likes of dead sheep, and will also kill its own food also, including small mammals and birds, reptiles, as well as taking eggs and eating insects and seeds.Ravens prefer to nest in a sheltered spot, favouring a rock crevice but also opting for trees. They build their nests from earth, moss, twigs and heather stalks, lining it with hair and wool. They raise just one brood per year, from February to March, which consists of 4-6 eggs.Ravens are extremely intelligent and in some cases can even learn to talk.Raven Lore: Folklore & LegendsThe Raven and WaterThe raven has a plethora of lore surrounding it. Richly interwoven into Celtic and Norse mythology, it also features in many superstitions and countless legends and stories, from Noah to the Tower of London.Those interested in perusing the very early stories of ravens should note that they often speak of the raven as the crow.The raven is often associated with water, often with the finding of water, or lack of it. Sacrificing gods sent the raven for water, but the bird delayed his mission to wait for some figs to ripen. Angry, the gods punished the raven by cursing him with a great thirst in the summer, which is said to be why the raven croaks.The Raven, Death and WarThe raven is also, quite famously, known as an omen of death. Being carrion feeders, seeing them feeding on gibbet corpses was once a common sight, and most likely where the association arose. A famous example of ravens being portends of death include the Roman philosopher, statesman and political theorist Cicero being forewarned of his death by the fluttering of ravens.Raven is a war bird. The Danes believed that observing ravens could help foretell the outcome of a battle. Indeed, they are said to have foretold the deaths of Plato and Tiberius, and told the Irish god Lugh of the invasion of the Formorians in Celtic mythology.The Raven and ProphecyThe raven is also frequently linked with prophecy, further enhancing its status as a bird of the occult. Not only was it a messenger of the gods, both as an informant and as a guide, but it also was thought to be the most prophetic of all birds. People are still referred to as having “the foresight of ravens”.Raven Augery and SymbolismRavens and the Weather, Negative Raven SuperstitionsWeather Raven Lore:Ravens facing the direction of a clouded sun foretell hot weatherIf you see a raven preening, rain is on the wayRaven Superstitions of Death and WarRavens flying towards each other signify an omen of warSeeing a raven tapping on a window foretold deathIf a raven is heard croaking near a house, there will be a death in itIf a raven flies around the chimney of a sick person’s house, they will diePositive Raven SuperstitionsMany parts of Celtic Britain and Ireland view the raven as a good omen:Shetland and Orkney - if a maiden sees a raven at Imbolc she can foretell the direction of her future husband’s home by following the raven’s path of flightWales - if a raven perches on a roof, it means prosperity for the familyScotland - deerstalkers believed it bode well to hear a raven before setting out on a huntIreland - ravens with white feathers were believed a good omen, especially if they had white on the wings. Ravens flying on your right hand or croaking simultaneously were also considered good omensSource and to read the rest of this excellent article:http://www.squidoo.com/raven-symbolism-lore
[ Image is a vintage illustration of a Raven circa 1830s ]

thegoblinmarketofficial:

Facts, Myth, and Lore about Ravens

The raven - bird of mystery, magic and omens both good and bad. Raven symbolism is rich and plentiful, with a plethora of raven mythology, raven lore and raven superstitions available from a wealth of cultures.

The raven often has a bad press, for being a carrion bird it is ultimately associated with death, and consequently considered a bad omen by many, or a forewarning of war.

But there is much more to this enigmatic and intelligent bird than death, darkness and destruction. Raven is a trickster, a protector, a teacher. and a bringer of great magic.


Raven Biology: Natural History of the Raven
About the Raven

Corvus Corax. Member of the crow family

The raven is not only the largest member of the crow family, but the largest perching bird in the world. An extremely intelligent bird, the raven was once extremely common, but persecution now finds it only in remote areas such as cliffs, mountains and moors.

The adult is completely black with a shaggy throat and heavy bill. It flies higher than the crow and is adept at aerial acrobatics.

It is a carrion bird, feeding the likes of dead sheep, and will also kill its own food also, including small mammals and birds, reptiles, as well as taking eggs and eating insects and seeds.

Ravens prefer to nest in a sheltered spot, favouring a rock crevice but also opting for trees. They build their nests from earth, moss, twigs and heather stalks, lining it with hair and wool. They raise just one brood per year, from February to March, which consists of 4-6 eggs.

Ravens are extremely intelligent and in some cases can even learn to talk.

Raven Lore: Folklore & Legends
The Raven and Water
The raven has a plethora of lore surrounding it. Richly interwoven into Celtic and Norse mythology, it also features in many superstitions and countless legends and stories, from Noah to the Tower of London.

Those interested in perusing the very early stories of ravens should note that they often speak of the raven as the crow.

The raven is often associated with water, often with the finding of water, or lack of it. Sacrificing gods sent the raven for water, but the bird delayed his mission to wait for some figs to ripen. Angry, the gods punished the raven by cursing him with a great thirst in the summer, which is said to be why the raven croaks.

The Raven, Death and War

The raven is also, quite famously, known as an omen of death. Being carrion feeders, seeing them feeding on gibbet corpses was once a common sight, and most likely where the association arose. A famous example of ravens being portends of death include the Roman philosopher, statesman and political theorist Cicero being forewarned of his death by the fluttering of ravens.

Raven is a war bird. The Danes believed that observing ravens could help foretell the outcome of a battle. Indeed, they are said to have foretold the deaths of Plato and Tiberius, and told the Irish god Lugh of the invasion of the Formorians in Celtic mythology.
The Raven and Prophecy

The raven is also frequently linked with prophecy, further enhancing its status as a bird of the occult. Not only was it a messenger of the gods, both as an informant and as a guide, but it also was thought to be the most prophetic of all birds. People are still referred to as having “the foresight of ravens”.

Raven Augery and Symbolism

Ravens and the Weather, Negative Raven Superstitions

Weather Raven Lore:

Ravens facing the direction of a clouded sun foretell hot weather

If you see a raven preening, rain is on the way

Raven Superstitions of Death and War

Ravens flying towards each other signify an omen of war

Seeing a raven tapping on a window foretold death

If a raven is heard croaking near a house, there will be a death in it

If a raven flies around the chimney of a sick person’s house, they will die

Positive Raven Superstitions

Many parts of Celtic Britain and Ireland view the raven as a good omen:

Shetland and Orkney - if a maiden sees a raven at Imbolc she can foretell the direction of her future husband’s home by following the raven’s path of flight

Wales - if a raven perches on a roof, it means prosperity for the family

Scotland - deerstalkers believed it bode well to hear a raven before setting out on a hunt

Ireland - ravens with white feathers were believed a good omen, especially if they had white on the wings. Ravens flying on your right hand or croaking simultaneously were also considered good omens

Source and to read the rest of this excellent article:http://www.squidoo.com/raven-symbolism-lore

[ Image is a vintage illustration of a Raven circa 1830s ]

anamichaelsis:

Edward Robert Hughes - Dream Idyll (A Valkyrie)

anamichaelsis:

Edward Robert Hughes - Dream Idyll (A Valkyrie)

(via karrova)

fripperiesandfobs:

Callot Soeurs evening dress, 1910-15
From the Amsterdam Museum

fripperiesandfobs:

Callot Soeurs evening dress, 1910-15

From the Amsterdam Museum

visitheworld:

Reflections of old Scotney Castle in Kent / England (by karl-georg).

visitheworld:

Reflections of old Scotney Castle in Kent / England (by ).

(via cleolinda)

melkorwashere:

daughter-of-odin:

voiceofnature:

The Making of a Hobbit- door!

Wow, that’s gorgeous.

#doors of Frodo’s house in Valinor